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Another new toy...

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stratoaxe View Drop Down
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    Posted: 01 March 2013 at 1:21am
Traded my Twin Reverb for a limited run Joe Bonamassa Gibson LP-




Never owned a real Gibson LP before, me likey.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote __sneaky__ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 2:54am
The fact that you HAD a twin reverb, and the fact that you now have a Gibson Les Paul makes me hate/love you twice as much.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stratoaxe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 3:21am
Originally posted by __sneaky__ __sneaky__ wrote:

The fact that you HAD a twin reverb, and the fact that you now have a Gibson Les Paul makes me hate/love you twice as much.


Twin Reverb's are surprisingly industrial.

By that I mean that they're geared for LOUD volume and they're durable.

The tone is gorgeous, but you're paying for volume. A princeton, blues jr, super reverb, or deluxe reverb will all give you sweet tone with less watts and more personality.

I'd never pay 1400 bucks for one, I'd soober pay 800 for a blues jr and get the breakup.

I like the LP, it sounds fantastic with that modded bassman's overdrive, but nothing matches my SRV run through my Vibro Champ.

On a side note, that case says Gibson USA on the outside and made in Canada in the inside. Blasphemy.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stratoaxe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 3:23am
Double post, but if you find a Vibro Champ XD, snatch it. They're hard to find but cheap and have gorgeous tone.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DeTrevni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 7:24am
Beautiful. I much prefer the way my Strat feels and plays, but I love love love the tone and beauty of my Les Paul. That gold is much nicer than my classic white, though.

My latest love is my banjo playing (see sig quote). I've got a Deering Goodtime that I cut my teeth on, and a Goodtime 2 (same banjo, but with a resonator back) thay I'm actually learning on. I want a Deering Calico or Black Diamond so badly, but I'm not at a point where I can justify a $3-4,000 banjo. One day...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stratoaxe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 10:01am
Yeah, I much prefer the sound and feel of my Stratocasters but the build quality of Gibson is hard to top in my price range.

I like white LP's, especially with the black pinstriping.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote __sneaky__ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 10:48am
I found an original 67 "black face" twin reverb, in a guitar shop recently. As badly as it hurt me to walk away from it, I couldn't justify forking over $2,200. That tone haunts my brain.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stratoaxe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 12:51pm
Yeah, before I'd do $2,200 on a vintage twin I'd look at a Two Rock or an old Super Reverb.

Supers are what Stevie played.

If you get a chance, go to a GC or licensed Fender dealer and play around on a Deluxe Reverb or even a Princeton. You can get that classic Fender clean for several hundred less than a Twin and without the earth shattering volume.

Those things are seriously loud. I can't overstate that
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stratoaxe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 12:53pm
Originally posted by DeTrevni DeTrevni wrote:

My latest love is my banjo playing (see sig quote). I've got a Deering Goodtime that I cut my teeth on, and a Goodtime 2 (same banjo, but with a resonator back) thay I'm actually learning on. I want a Deering Calico or Black Diamond so badly, but I'm not at a point where I can justify a $3-4,000 banjo. One day...


I love banjos. The techniques translate nicely to six string soloing.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DeTrevni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 5:07pm
The first thing I had to learn when I started banjo lessons was to forget pretty much everything about guitar. The bluegrass banjo technique requires a right to left hand coordination that's wholly different from plectrum guitar. It was interesting the first few lessons...
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote __sneaky__ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 6:51pm

My main concern is how they will sound when running a micro amp > wah pedal > big muff/tube screamer through them. Some amps accept pedals better than others,

 but I'm not familiar enough with the various models to know which would be a better option.


I did find a super reverb for ~$550 recently too.


*my phone hates this forum.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stratoaxe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 7:56pm
Well, SRV ran dual Tube Screamers through a super reverb and had mildly successful results.

The Big Muff I'm not sure on. I tried one out on my twin once and hated it, but then again I'm not a GIANT fan of those pedals.

Fender Reverbs accept pedals nicely within the confines of what they are. It's just like Fender Strats-you just can't hide normal Fender single coils. The tone just bleeds through.

So any Fender clean amp will do poorly with large amounts of distortion as opposed to a Marshall or Vox.

In fact, a good middle ground for you might be Peavey. Peavey makes a few amps like the 5150 that have decent cleans but will melt your face with distortion. Plus they're cheap.

If you have the money, Marshall is the great compromise. Warm, natural cleans with legendary distortion. When I get the cash a Plexi is my dream amp, second maybe to a JCM 800.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote __sneaky__ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 9:25pm
I'm playing through a Fender Ultimate Chorus Deluxe currently. It's not a bad amp by any means, but I'd prefer a tube amp, and my current amp and the big muff don't typically get along. (although it does sound pretty wicked when I'm playing around with a slide.) Turning the reverb all the way down seems to help too.

If I decide to spring for a new amp, I'll trade in my current amp and my Epi Les Paul, but even still, I'd like to try to keep my budget around the $500-800 mark if possible. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote __sneaky__ Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2013 at 9:30pm
Originally posted by DeTrevni DeTrevni wrote:

The first thing I had to learn when I started banjo lessons was to forget pretty much everything about guitar. The bluegrass banjo technique requires a right to left hand coordination that's wholly different from plectrum guitar. It was interesting the first few lessons...
I noticed this very quickly when I was playing around on a friend's banjo. Strumming isn't really much of an option on a banjo - at least from my limited experience.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DeTrevni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2013 at 12:16am
Originally posted by __sneaky__ __sneaky__ wrote:

Originally posted by DeTrevni DeTrevni wrote:

The first thing I had to learn when I started banjo lessons was to forget pretty much everything about guitar. The bluegrass banjo technique requires a right to left hand coordination that's wholly different from plectrum guitar. It was interesting the first few lessons...
I noticed this very quickly when I was playing around on a friend's banjo. Strumming isn't really much of an option on a banjo - at least from my limited experience.

Well, yes and no. Banjos' standard tuning is open G, so the string order is this: g, D, G, B, d. Yup, the 5th string is actually the highest. So, high G, low D, then progressively higher again. They make banjos designed for rhythm strumming that eliminate the 5th string, which can make a chord sound a bit tinny. The 5-string banjo is designed for finger picking, and that high 5th string adds the characteristic brightness of a good banjo lick. 

Earl Scruggs perfected the 3-finger picking style (now known today as "Scruggs Style" picking), and developed the modern bluegrass style that requires left hand movements that occur almost between the movement of the right-hand roll. For example, a popular lick that Scruggs used was a quick slide from the 2nd fret of the G string to the 3rd fret, then released. It was a movement like tossing the note. HOWEVER, and this is the trick, you didn't initiate the slide until you picked the next note in the sequence, so you'd pick G string, fret 3, then when you picked B string open you'd slide the fretted G string. Most of fast banjo playing is a combination of those kind of syncopated licks....

Edit: Here's an example what I mean. You can hear the slide in the main lick:




Edited by DeTrevni - 02 March 2013 at 12:19am
Evil Elvis: "Detrevni is definally like a hillbilly hippy from hell"

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