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James Cameron Reached the Ocean's Lowest Point

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    Posted: 26 March 2012 at 8:04am
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/03/120325-james-cameron-mariana-trench-challenger-deep-deepest-science-sub/


He was running real 3D cameras the whole time and he collected samples from the floor.

Heres a pic of his sub:



Originally posted by National Geographic National Geographic wrote:


To get to this point, Cameron and his crew have spent seven years reimagining what a submersible can be. The result is the 24-foot-tall (7-meter-tall) DEEPSEA CHALLENGER.

Engineered to sink upright and spinning, like a bullet fired straight into the Mariana Trench, the sub can descend about 500 feet (150 meters) a minute—"amazingly fast," in the words of Robert Stern, a marine geologist at the University of Texas at Dallas.

Pre-expedition estimates put the Challenger Deep descent at about 90 minutes.

By contrast, some current remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs, descend at about 40 meters (130 feet) a minute, added Stern, who isn't part of the expedition.



Successfully completed:


Originally posted by National Geographic National Geographic wrote:


At noon, local time (10 p.m. ET), James Cameron's "vertical torpedo" sub broke the surface of the western Pacific, carrying the National Geographic explorer and filmmaker back from the Mariana Trench's Challenger Deep—Earth's deepest, and perhaps most alien, realm.

The first human to reach the 6.8-mile-deep (11-kilometer-deep) undersea valley solo, Cameron arrived at the bottom with the tech to collect scientific data, specimens, and visions unthinkable in 1960, when the only other manned Challenger Deep dive took place, according to members of the National Geographic expedition.

After a faster-than-expected, roughly 70-minute ascent, Cameron's sub, bobbing in the open ocean, was spotted by helicopter and would soon be plucked from the Pacific by a research ship's crane. Earlier, the descent to Challenger Deep had taken 2 hours and 36 minutes.



Edited by Rofl_Mao - 26 March 2012 at 8:11am
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stratoaxe View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stratoaxe Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 March 2012 at 8:52am
Read about that last night...cool stuff.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JohnnyCanuck Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 March 2012 at 10:13am
pretty neat looking sub, must have been dark down there.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Benjichang Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 March 2012 at 11:08am
I hope this expedition shines some new light on one of the most extreme environments on Earth.

Kind of tangential to this:

I find it amazing that nearly 7 miles down in the ocean, in a place with such extreme pressures and cold temperatures, there are still things living down there.

Life seems to be so prevalent once it takes hold- from the deepest, coldest ocean trench, to hot springs, to Antarctic ice, it's everywhere. Life keeps turning up in places that scientists originally wrote off as being inhospitable. Based on this, maybe that's the pattern with life on other planets. Once it takes hold, it can't be stopped.

Life is the norm. When it happens, it flourishes. 


edit- He reminds me of this guy in that pic:



Edited by Benjichang - 26 March 2012 at 11:10am
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote RoboCop Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 March 2012 at 11:56am
The thing is about other planets, for their to be life, and based off of what you said, there has to be water. Not frozen water, but standing water for millions of years. Which brings us to if other planets had standing water long enough before it either froze or disappeared. The organisms will then adapt themselves to be able to survive such harsh conditions.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bravecoward Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 March 2012 at 12:02pm
Alternative headline: "James Cameron reaches new low"
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GroupB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 March 2012 at 4:00pm
Originally posted by bravecoward bravecoward wrote:

Alternative headline: "James Cameron SINKS TO new low"
 
 
Amateur.
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