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How the Model 98 Works

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    Posted: 05 January 2006 at 7:53pm

This is how the Tippmann Model 98 works. I will list each part and tell what it does. In the case of several of the same parts doing the same thing, I will just say it once, but list how many of them there are.

First we have the two recievers, or the two sides of the body. This is what everything else attatches to and is held together by. In the case of this marker, the two recievers are made so that the internals are lined up in a "single tube" style. That means that they are lined up in one long line, for the most part. Its a very simple and easy design.

To hold the two recievers together there are a set of nuts and bolts that fit into specific holes in the recievers. There are a total of 6. Each one is important and should be replaced promptly in the event that it becomes stripped. Some also may need to be tighter then others. For example, if you overtighten the screw nearest to the front sight it will prevent you from pushing down the front sight and release the elbow. Others, like the one nearest the powertube, you may want to tighten a little tighter. Never overtighten any of them though. All six screws go into the left reciever.

There are also screws that hold in the ASA, or air source adapter. This is what the tank screws into. They go through the designated holes in the ASA and through holes into the grip frame, where there are two nuts there held in possition by the recievers. They are two different lengths as well. The longest one goes to the rear of the ASA, closest to where the tank screws in.

The powertube goes near the front of the tubed part of the reciever. It is held in by two screws on the right reciever. The powertube should only be removed when absolutly nessicary. If you strip the powertube where the screws go in you will have to buy a new one. Not so simple as buying a new screw or nut. The powertube is where the air goes. It has a valve in it that opens and closes by the bolt. If you look in the rear of the powertube you will see a pin. When you push this pin it pushes the cup seal into the valve, opening it up. When the bolt comes flying through there and hits the pin that is what happens. When the air comes out it pushes the bolt back, and it goes through four cannals along the length of the powertube and past the volocity screw, through the bolt, and against the paintball. The volocity screw is a screw that simply causes turbulance in the airflow going to the paintball. This is what regulates how much air gets to the paintball, in turn regulating the volocity.

The air gets to the powertube through the steal hose going into it. The other end of the steal hose goes into the ASA. When you screw the tank into that ASA the ASA opens the pin valve. The air comes out of the tank, through the ASA, through the steal hose and into the powertube, where it is stoped by the cup seal mentioned earlier.

The end cap does several things. One, it obviously fills that big hole in the rear of the marker. It also holds the drive spring guide pin. It will also keep the rear bolt from flying out of the back of the marker when the air pushes it. To better understand the importance of this piece you need to understand the pieces that are involved with it. Thats whats coming up next.

The drive spring guide is a pin that keeps the drive spring guided. One end goes into the end cap and the other into the rear bolt. The drive spring pushes the bolt forward, when its released by the sear, and makes it hit the valve pin, opening the valve and letting air out. The spring fits over the guide pin.

The rear bolt is a big and heavy round piece of metal that has some holes in it. There are actually three basic parts to it. There is the big main part. This is basically what I said above, a piece of metal. It has holes and things in it for the other parts. The second part is another piece of metal that goes inside the other metal part. I'm starting to get a little confusing now aren't I? Too many big metal parts. Basically you have a heavy metal part that has a big space in it. The other metal part, which is lighter, fills this space. Its mainly there to hold the drive spring guide pin in place. There is also the cocking handle. It comes out of the slot in the side of the left reciever, allowing you to manualy cock the bolt back.

The linkage are in an arm that connects the front and rear bolts. It runs along a small cannal down the top of the recievers, above the powertube. It bends down on each end to go into both the front and rear bolt. Now when the rear bolt moves it moves the front bolt too. Pretty nifty huh? The front bolt fits over the long skinny part of the power tube. When its back, like the rear bolt, it just sits there. In front of it falls a paintball. Then when the rear bolt goes forward the front bolt pushes a paintball into the barrel. It acts as sort of a powertube extension, and when the air comes through the powertube it goes through to front bolt and onto the paintball, pushing it out of the barrel.

The reason this rear bolt has stayed back this whole time I was talking is because of the sear. Its located under the rear bolt. It is a piece of metal(yes, another one) that is held in place by a pin. There is also a spring that attatches to it. The other end of the spring goes over a pin so that it pulls the end of the sear its attatched to down. The other end goes up. When the bolt goes back past a certain point it will get caught on the sear as it tries to go the other way. The sear can move a little forwards and backwards on the sear too. I don't really know how to explain it in words only. I'll try to explain later when I get into the trigger.

Now were onto the trigger, haha, and its time to explain how that sear works. Ok, trigger is held in place by a pin. There is another pin that keeps it from moving past a certain point. Ok.. So now we have a trigger that can only be pulled past a certain point. Now, the end of this trigger, when pulled, will push up on the end of the sear that the sear spring is pulling down on. That is how the sear is moved out of the bolts way. When the bolt is putting pressure on the sear it pushes it towards the front of the marker. This puts it within reach of the end of the trigger. When the bolt goes down the marker and isn't putting anymore pressure on the sear the sear can move back towards the rear of the marker, and out of reach of the trigger. Now the sear spring pulls it back down and the bolt can be caught by it again. Untill you release and pull the trigger again it will not move the sear and release the bolt. The trigger must "reset" after each shot. This makes sure you don't go full auto. I know your going to ask, so I will go ahead and answer. Yes, making the sear to where it cannot "move away from the trigger" will allow you to go full auto. The only thing is, you will be going full auto way too fast and you will chop paint like mad. Plus its outlawed at most fields. Now that you have made me loose my train of tought on the trigger and sear I will move on. If I remeber what else I was going to say I will add it later.

Oh, yeah... There is a trigger spring, obviously. It holds the trigger forward untill you pull it backwards. Its connected on one end to the trigger and the other on another pin. The sear pin is black and the rest are silver. They are the only pins in the marker other then the valve pin which you don't have to worry about, the drive spring guide pin which is different enough you don't have to worry about, and the front sight pin. The front sight pin is silver, but it is shorter. So don't get them mixed up.

Now we move onto the rear sight. If you can't figure that one out on your own then you might as well give up now. The front sight is a little different though. As you may have noticed it locks the elbow in place. Pretty cool. You can push it down to make it let go. I bet you can guess what keeps pushing it back up.. Yep. Another spring! Its a bit of a different spring though. A little harder to put in. There is also the front sight pin. It keeps the front sight from moving around, even though it obviously lets it rotate. These are a little tricky to get in right, although once you get the hang of it there shouldn't be a problem. Here is how I get them in. First I put the spring down. Just lay it there. The little piece that sticks out should be sticking towards you. It should also be in the top right hand corner of the spring. Now, take the front sight and lay it down so that the little piece of the spring sticking out sticks into the hole on the front sight spring. Now, push down on the front sight spring and push ot so that the other hole, the bigger one, is over the hole in the reciever where the front sight pin goes. Then stick in the front sight pin. Don't let go though, or the spring could still send everything flying. Just kindof gently let off and see if it will fly anywhere. If it doesn't, great, if it does, just kindof giggle it around till it doesn't. Thats all I have to say about that.

Lets move onto the front handle thing. Refer to "Rear sight"

Ok, onto the grips. These probably don't need an explenation either, but just for those of you who read the "For Dumbies" books, here you go. (just kidding) Ok, the left one goes on the left and the right one goes on the right. Line up the holes and put in the screws. You don't need to make it real tight. If you do the screw head will squeeze through the rubber and your grip will fall off, then everyone will laugh. Just kidding again.

The elbow is pretty easy too. Actually, all of the Tippmann is, but this is really easy. You put the little pin things in the holes on the right reciever. Then you rotate it up and let it latch onto the front sight. There you go.

Now, there is the ball detent. This is what keeps the paintball from rolling out the barrel before the front bolt pushes them. Make sure you put it in right or you will have trouble. You will also most likely have trouble if you leave it out compleaty. Blocky part goes down into the blocky part on the reciever, naturally. Now, here is where most people do it wrong. The slope needs to slope upwards and outwards. So it slopes up toward the barrel. Since you know how it works, you probably could have guessed that, but oh well.

Thats all I can think of for now, thank goodness. If I left anything out, or if you have any questions, just ask. Note, I didn't go into detail about anything really, and especially not about the valve. There are a few more parts, but you most likely wont ever need to know.

If you see any gramatical errors, be sure to point them out. I just typed this now and didn't give it a once over or run it though a spell check. And, if you read all that in one sitting good for you. I would have given you e-cookies, but I just realize that I TYPED it in one sitting. So I'm going to eat my own e-cookies. And if there is any false info in there then please let me know. Most of this is common sense, but in some areas I may hav gotten a fact or two a little twisted, like when it comes to the vavle.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Snake6 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 January 2006 at 8:07pm
good post, but its been done before.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote stealthy2 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 January 2006 at 8:50pm
Oh, sorry. I didn't see it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote XxCS2xX Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 January 2006 at 12:23am

When ur talking about the valve screws u should aslo put that not to over tighten them or they could get striped and thats bad......I know

Tippmann M98
Halo B
32 deg. Stock
Tippmann Xpansionon chamber
Polished Internals
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Monk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 January 2006 at 12:57am
Originally posted by XxCS2xX XxCS2xX wrote:

When ur talking about the valve screws u should aslo put that not to over tighten them or they could get striped and thats bad......I know



Stripped valve screw holes blows butt.
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